Showing all 4 results

The Essential Lingo Dictionary: of Australian Words and Phrases

The Essential Lingo Dictionary is a warts-and-all look at the notoriously hilarious (and occasionally a little bit naughty) canon of Australian slang words and phrases, casting light on the quirky, intriguing and often bizarre Australian Aussie language. A must-have for every bookshelf!
If you have wondered why his girlfriend is a ‘Sheila’ even though her name is Sophia, or why your colleagues in Melbourne’s suburbs are said to live ‘beyond the black stump’, then this book is for you.

SPECIFICATIONS: Paperback | 210 x 135 mm / 8 ⅓ x 5 ⅓ Inches | 208 Pages |

The Godzone Dictionary: of Favourite New Zealand Words and Phrases

The Godzone Dictionary is a concise A-Z of the words and phrases that make our New Zealand language and speech patterns so distinctive and individual, from Aotearoa and Avondale spiders to Zambuck and Zespri. Slang words and expressions feature heavily, while one of the unique features of this book is the large number of Maori words that have become a part of our common language in recent years. The listing also includes the popular names of our sports teams (so often confused!) and an appendix of common New Zealand acronyms.

SPECIFICATIONS: Paperback | 210 x 135 mm / 8 ⅓ x 5 ⅓ Inches | 192 Pages |

The Right Word: Making sense of the words that confuse

Corporate Discounts and Training Sessions in Media Writing available. Click here to enquire.

An easy-to-use reference guide to the words that most commonly confuse people in written English. Written by a teacher and journalist with years of experience in effective writing and communication.

‘Affect’ or ‘effect’? ‘Right’, ‘write’ or ‘rite’? ‘Soul’ or ‘sole’? ‘Pawn’ or ‘porn’? English can certainly be a confusing language, whether you’re a native speaker or learning it as a second language. This is the essential reference to help people master its subtleties and avoid making mistakes.  Entries are organised alphabetically, with meanings and examples (including colloquial ones) being given to facilitate correct use. The book then looks at words that often confuse — childish vs. childlike, incredible vs. incredulous, for example — before providing a list of commonly misspelled words. It’s a book that deserves a place on every bookshelf: at home, in the study and at the office.

SPECIFICATIONS: Paperback | 198 x 126 mm / 7 ⅘ x 5 Inches | 256 Pages |

Who Said That First?: The curious origins of common words and phrases

Believe it or not, this is probably the first book to attempt to identify the original sources of some of the English language’s most common expressions. We might think we know who first said famous for fifteen minutes, annus horribilis, the cold war and let them eat cake. It’s a no brainer, you might say, but Max Cryer has a surprise or two in store for you. I kid you not. In this very readable book, he explores the origins of hundreds of expressions we use and hear every day – and comes up with some surprising findings. Never economical with the truth, he might just have the last laugh.

We learn what they didn’t say…We are not amused; Elementary my dear Watson; Let them eat cake; First catch your hareWe learn that the Bible doesn’t mention Salome – or seven veils…. We learn about the origins of the infamous Mile High Club.

SPECIFICATIONS: Paperback | 210 x 135 mm / 8 ¼ x 5 ⅓ Inches | 320 Pages |