The Nek

One of the greatest tragedies in Australian military history occurred at Gallipoli on 7th August 1915, when hundreds of soldiers were repeatedly ordered to charge the massed rifles and machine guns of the Turkish enemy. It was a bloodbath, a hopeless endeavour that has been the subject of considerable scrutiny by historians.

This new edition of Peter Burness’ classic book features arresting new photographs, maps and information. In it, he examines the formation, training and character of the regiments involved and devotes careful attention to considering how, and why, the suicidal charges were allowed to continue when all hope of success was lost.

SPECIFICATIONS:  Paperback | 234 x 153 mm | 9¼ x 6 in | 168 + 8pp Insert Pages |

Peter Burness is a Senior Historian at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra and the Memorial’s longest serving employee. A specialist in the battles of World War One, he has written several books on the subject, and has also worked on numerous permanent, temporary and travelling exhibitions.

The charge at The Nek has been immortalised in art, literature and film and has come to epitomise both the futility and courage of the Gallipoli campaign. This new edition includes new information, maps and photographs.

On 7 August 1915, in an ill-fated attempt to break the stalemate at Gallipoli, hundreds of Australian light horsemen repeatedly charged the massed rifles and machine-guns of the Turkish soldiers.

The charge at The Nek has been immortalised in art, literature and film and has come to epitomise both the futility and courage of the Gallipoli campaign.

In this classic book, Peter Burness provides the best account ever published of the formation and training of the Light Horse regiments (including profiles of the officers involved), the battle itself and a careful consideration of how the suicidal charges were allowed to continue when any hope of success was lost.

For this new edition, the author has updated the text to include new information that has come to light since the book was first published in 1996. New maps and photographs are also included.

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